Know the Difference Between HTHV and 80/20 Technologies – It Makes a Difference To Your IAQ!

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For years High Temperature Heating and Ventilation (HTHV), a direct-fired 100% outside air technology, and 80/20 direct-fired units have been heating solutions used for new construction and retrofit projects throughout the US with little attention to the differences in Indoor Air Quality (IAQ) from both products. However, when it comes to IAQ there are significant differences between these two technologies – HTHV being the clear winner.

The Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) was created to assure safe and healthful working conditions for working men and women by setting and enforcing standards and by providing training, outreach, education and assistance1.

Among the frequently asked questions on the OSHA website is one concerning IAQ:

What is considered good IAQ?

The qualities of good IAQ should include comfortable temperature and humidity, adequate supply of fresh outdoor air, and control of pollutants from inside and outside of the building2.

It is these pollutants, and the amount of the pollutants in parts per million (PPM), that differentiate 100% outside air HTHV technologies apart from 80/20 units. Both OSHA and the Canadian Standards Association (CSA) set limits on what the acceptable PPMs for different pollutants are for working environments. The performance and safety standards set by the American National Standards Institute (ANSI) are z83.4 for 100% outside air non-recirculating direct gas-fired industrial air heaters and z83.18 for 80/20 recirculating direct gas-fired industrial air heaters. The infographic below helps illustrate the differing amount of pollutants in PPM between HTHV and 80/20 units along with the acceptable limits for these pollutants in both the US and Canada.

1 Reference OSHA website: www.osha.gov/about.html
2 Reference OSHA website: www.osha.gov/OSHA_FAQs.html

Grow Your Retrofit Business With Cambridge HTHV Technology

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When it comes to providing retrofit heating solutions for older, outdated and inefficient heating products you should look no farther than Cambridge Engineering’s High Temperature Heating and Ventilation (HTHV) products. Our products are an exceptional heating solution for warehouse, distribution and manufacturing facilities that are in need of a solution to provide better indoor comfort, reduce energy consumption and provide need ventilation during occupied hours even on the coldest of days.

To learn more about HTHV technology can be used in retrofit opportunities watch this short video:

Stay tuned for more videos from Cambridge on how to use our products in retrofit opportunities.

For more information visit us at www.cambridge-eng.com and fill out the contact us form.

TEN SALES LESSONS FROM GOLF

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I really enjoy golf.    I love how the game brings people together from all walks of life and stages in life.   Being outdoors for 2-4 hours in a world of offices and meetings is great for friends, families and business associates.  Golf teaches several life lessons that help anyone seeking to improve performance.

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TEN SALES PERFORMANCE – GOLF LESSONS

  1. Learn/Practice: Sales people are made.  They are not created.   Just like the best players in the golf game, those that commit to practicing and learning their craft, fare better than those that are winging it.
  2. Have Fun: If you have passion and energy for something and can enjoy the experience, you are going to return to it again and again.   If you don’t feel the special calling, do something else.  We must be inspired.
  3. Expect to Win: Just like seeing the putt role in the hole or the approach shot rattle the pin, expect greatness and great outcomes.   Visualize the best outcome without worry of the worst.  The best outcome is just as likely as the worst.   Focus on the best.
  4. Slow Down: Forget all the prep, all the practice, let your instincts work with all the preparation you’ve done.  Focus on the here and now and be present, with awareness of your surroundings.  Rushing towards the next move is not required.   Live in the now.  Your customers will love the way you listen to them.
  5. Develop a Rhythm: I often rewind PGA tour swings on my DVR and it drives my kids crazy.   I love the tempo and the rhythms of the PGA tour professionals.   Think about Ernie Els swing for a moment.   Daily, weekly, monthly, quarterly, annual rhythms are vital to our success.   What are you cementing into process that demonstrates a consistency and a rhythm?
  6. Ease Up: Don’t be your own worst critic.   Every pass doesn’t have to be flawless.   Hitting better bad shots is the objective.  The flawless ones, the pure ones will come when they come.  Work on making the misses more on target.   Keep taking shots and moving forward with positive attitude.   Be too hard one’s self and watch how joy and results follow.
  7. Focus on the process: This probably borrows from #1 and #5, however, I like it for the message around regarding one’s focus on the process and not the result as the worthy endeavor.   When we can commit our process to paper or in very succinct clear language, then your process is crystallized.   Thinking LEAN, or 2-Second Lean (author: Paul Akers), I might say that a written best practice approach on process is appropriate.   In golf, one’s putting routine process or tee box pre shot ritual or the very swing itself reminds us that process matters.   The result may look different each time.  Focus on process.  Nail process.
  8. You don’t know where it’s going, but you can’t stay here: It is hard for us to be humble and accept that change is needed.   Change starts with humility and an acceptance that we are not yet fully adapted and evolved.   Embrace change not for change sake, but for the continuous improvement mindset.  Hope is about a better tomorrow in all things.
  9. Respect Others: The golf game etiquette we are all taught as we learned the game reflects life lessons regarding the value of others.  Thinking beyond ourselves to listen and accept the ideas and perspectives of others.   Just like we don’t walk in someone’s line or speak in their backswing, we don’t walk on someone’s perspective or speak over them in conference.
  10. Let It Rip: Commit and go do it. Activity builds momentum.  Perpetual planning and plan revision thwarts pace.   Take 1 less meeting per week and make 1 more appointment or networking appointment each week.

 

Thank you for continuing to follow us here at “The Fresh Air Stream.”   I would love to hear from you regarding valuable life lessons that have impacted your success.  Please like this post and share it with other golfers in your lives